Summary of the situation report bulletin (1/2021) published online

In the previous bulletin, I mentioned that the BioEM2021 conference would be held online, and possibly also in a new location in Europe in June 2021. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the situation has changed once again. According to the organizers the BioEM2021 conference will be held September 26 – October 1, 2021, in Ghent, Belgium. The conference will be organized using a hybrid model.

Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, quite a few studies related to electric and magnetic fields have still been published. Once again, I have found new scientific articles of interest for this bulletin. It seems that exposure to electric fields has attracted more attention than before. For example, a study has been conducted on how you can reduce exposure to electric fields near power lines. Another study looked into human perception of electric fields, conducting the tests in laboratory conditions.

This time, the bulletin includes three articles that discuss occupational health issues. For example, in France, a cohort study is being conducted on retirees from the French Electricity Transmission Network (RTE, Réseau de Transport d’Electricité) who were occupationally exposed to 50 Hz magnetic fields. The article presents the protocol and the results of the first wave of inclusion. I’m really looking forward to hearing more results from this study.

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Summary of the situation report bulletin (2/2020) published online

In the previous bulletin, I mentioned that the BioEM2021 conference would be held in June 2021 in Hawaii. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the situation has changed. According to the organizers (the European BioElectromagnetics Association and Bioelectromagnetics Society), the BioEM2021 conference will be held online, and possibly also in a new location in Europe, June 13–18, 2021.

The ICNIRP website advises that they have canceled the 9th International NIR Workshop in South Korea that was scheduled for January 2021. According to the website announcement, their aim is to continue meetings as a scientific community in the future, either on virtual platforms or on-site as well, in the long run. They advise you to stay tuned for any updates by subscribing to the ICNIRP newsletter.

Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, quite a few studies related to electric and magnetic fields have still been published. The first article in this bulletin is a publication that explores the risk of childhood leukemia and socioeconomic factors in Denmark. The article doesn’t deal with electric and magnetic fields directly, but I think it provides useful background information on the theme.

These bulletins have traditionally focused more on public exposure rather than occupational exposure. This time, however, I found a number of interesting articles on occupational exposure, so I included more of them than usual. These articles discuss motor neuron diseases, among other things.

Hope you enjoy reading this summary in English!

Summary of the situation report bulletin (1/2020) published online

In the previous bulletin, I mentioned that this year would see a number of interesting events. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, however, these events have been either postponed or canceled. The ICNIRP website has advised that they have rescheduled the 9th International NIR Workshop in South Korea to January 14–15, 2021. The BioEM2020 conference was canceled, so the next conference will be BioEM2021, to be held June 13–18, 2021, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, quite a few studies related to electric and magnetic fields have been published. The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has published an article on the gaps in knowledge relevant to the guidelines for limiting exposure to electric and magnetic fields (1 Hz–100 kHz).

Once again, I have found new scientific articles of interest for this bulletin. The first of them is a paper on childhood leukemia. The article discusses the relation between maternal cumulative exposure to electromagnetic fields and the baby being premature or small for gestational age (SGA). The last article of this bulletin deals with occupational exposure, this time focusing on live-line work and the magnetic field exposure related to that.

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Summary of the situation report bulletin (2/2019) published online

In November 2019, two interesting seminars were held in Germany: first, November 5–7, the International Workshop: Environmental effects of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields: Flora and Fauna, and later, November 20–22, the 6th International Workshop on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia.

I took part in the first-mentioned seminar. The International Workshop: Environmental effects of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields: Flora and fauna discussed topics such as how birds use the Earth’s magnetic field for navigation as well as research on bats, dogs and honeybees, among others. The Earth’s magnetic field is, obviously, different than fields from electrical systems, but it was, nevertheless, interesting to find out about the wide range of research carried out on magnetoreception.

I have found some interesting scientific publications for this new situation report bulletin, which starts with a paper on the possible association between power lines and childhood leukemia. Occupational exposure is discussed in a paper that explores cancer incidence in UK electricity supply industry workers. Covering quite a vast amount of data from the years 1973–2015, this study reaches far beyond the scope of electric and magnetic fields.

This time, inspired by the seminar I attended in Germany, I chose to conclude the bulletin with a paper on dogs. It was news to me that dogs can be trained to identify the magnetic field of a bar magnet. While there are other dog-related studies available, this struck me as the most interesting. I would also like to remind you that, instead of fields from power lines, this paper is about bar magnets.

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Summary of the situation report bulletin (1/2019) published online

During the process of compiling this issue of the Situation Report Bulletin, I took part in the annual joint meeting of the Bioelectromagnetics Society (BEMS) and the European Bioelectromagnetics Association (EBEA). The BioEM2019 conference, held June 23–28 in Montpellier, France, presented a wide range of interesting studies on electric and magnetic fields. More information can be found on the conference website.

According to the website of ICNIRP, the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation, the Commission is holding its 9th workshop on non-ionizing radiation in South Korea in May next year.

Once again, I have found new scientific publications of interest for this bulletin. The bulletin starts with papers on the possible association between power lines and childhood leukemia. One of the studies investigates whether there have been changes over time in the reported risk of childhood leukemia associated with magnetic fields, while another focuses on the association of parental occupational exposures and the risk of childhood acute leukemia.

Occupational exposures are discussed in two more papers, with the first one dealing with the effect of chronic exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on sleep quality, stress, depression, and anxiety. The second one reports on a pooled study, with data from three different countries, exploring the associations of occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields and electric shocks with the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Hope you enjoy reading this summary in English!